UTHSC In The Media


In The Media

Here Are Some Good Eating Habits for 2017


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If you’ve resolved to adopt better eating habits in 2017, here’s some advice:
Eat on a regular schedule, and don’t skip meals. This helps keep you satiated and prevents unnecessary grazing. Eating regular meals is also a key strategy in successful weight loss and weight maintenance efforts. Those dealing with medical issues, like diabetes, pre-diabetes or episodes of hypoglycemia, usually find eating on a regular schedule promotes better blood sugar control. In addition, regularly timed meals can help improve medication management, as most dosing recommendations include taking pills with meals.

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For New Plough Center Director, Job is Calling


The Daily News

For Dr. Harry Kochat, the best parts of working in pharmaceutical development are the interactions with grateful patients. Like the one he remembers from early in his career, when Kochat – whose work has focused on the development of life-saving drugs for more than three decades – encountered a mother and her young son.

That drug went on to be used at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital to treat brain tumors. The first batch of that drug was produced in one of the pharmaceutical manufacturing facilities in Memphis on the campus of the University of Tennessee Health Science Center.

That’s where the tug of fate has now nudged Kochat himself. He’s the new director of the Plough Center for Sterile Drug Delivery Systems at UTHSC, recruited by Dr. Ken Brown – UTHSC’s executive vice chancellor and chief operations officer – to direct the Plough Center’s two manufacturing facilities.

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Grandfamilies: The Health Challenges of Raising Grandchildren


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With an opioid abuse epidemic raging, many children of parents addicted to prescription painkillers or heroin, or whose parents have died from overdosing on the powerful drugs, are now being cared for by their grandparents. That’s contributed significantly to a rise in so-called grandfamilies: As of last year, 2.9 million children in the U.S. were living with grandparents who were responsible for their care, according to a report from the Pew Charitable Trusts’ news service Stateline. That’s up from 2.5 million in 2005.

There are many other reasons a grandparent may end up needing to be a full-time caretaker for a grandchild, too. They include parental death from any cause, incarceration, mental illness, physical illness, divorce, homelessness, military deployment or having teenage parents, says Jaia Peterson Lent, deputy executive director at District of Columbia-based Generations United, a national nonprofit that seeks to improve the lives of children and older people, with an emphasis on connecting the generations. “There are also cases where parents need to move elsewhere for employment but do not have resources to bring the children with them,” she says.

[See: 14 Ways Caregivers Can Care for Themselves.]

Be open in discussing challenges. Some grandparents may be embarrassed to acknowledge that they’re taking care of their children’s children, says Carolyn Graff, chief of nursing at the Boling Center for Developmental Disabilities at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center in Memphis — such as in circumstances where a grown child is incarcerated or facing other potentially sensitive issues. But by acknowledging it, she says, grandparents can more clearly communicate their needs.

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Good Sleep Crucial to Seniors


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f you think good sleep hygiene means taking a bath before bedtime, read on. While cleanliness is admirable, there’s more to this type of hygiene than soap and water.

Good sleep hygiene involves all the things you do to get ready for sleep — your bedtime routine. And it can mean the difference between spending the night staring at the ceiling and waking up exhausted, or getting a good night’s sleep and starting the day refreshed.

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Memphis Health Care Thrives with Investments, Growth


The Daily News

Methodist Healthcare made a “great commitment” to Memphis this year. Those are the words of Methodist University Hospital CEO Jeff Liebman, who referenced the health care system’s multimillion-dollar investment into its flagship hospital at 1265 Union Ave., part of a master plan that will give the facility a modern overhaul.

On the facilities front, UTHSC continued work toward the opening in 2017 of its $36.7 million educational facility – the Interprofessional Simulation and Patient Safety Center, which will bring students from all six UTHSC colleges to train together in simulation settings.

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UTHSC Faculty Members Get Almost $4 Million in Funding for Military Research Projects


The Daily News

A trio of University of Tennessee Health Science Center professors has won almost $4 million in grant funding to pursue studies that could produce insights eventually useful to the military.

They’re separate studies, one focused on a look at tobacco use by military recruits. Two of the three faculty members are working on that one.

The other is a program to help women in the military return to fitness standards after giving birth. That project is the result of a cooperative agreement between UTHSC and the U.S. Air Force.

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UTHSC Drug Development Center Gets New Director, Facility


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For Dr. Harry Kochat, the new director of the Plough Center for Sterile Drug Delivery Systems at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center (UTHSC), coming to Memphis means coming full circle.

Kochat has been in pharmaceutical development for more than 30 years, and the first drug he developed was formulated at the original Plough Center on the UTHSC campus.