UTHSC In The Media


In The Media

UTHSC Drug Development Center Gets New Director, Facility


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For Dr. Harry Kochat, the new director of the Plough Center for Sterile Drug Delivery Systems at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center (UTHSC), coming to Memphis means coming full circle.

Kochat has been in pharmaceutical development for more than 30 years, and the first drug he developed was formulated at the original Plough Center on the UTHSC campus.

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New health care law touted as ‘most important bill of the year’


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U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., is touting the 21st Century Cures bill, which the Senate and House have now passed and President Barack Obama is expected to sign, as “the most important bill of the year.”

The $6.3 billion legislation includes $1 billion to fight opioid abuse and $1.8 billion for Vice President Joe Biden’s “cancer moonshot” initiative; changes the way the federal Food and Drug Administration approves drugs and medical devices; and pushes hospitals and doctors to make it easy to share data on their patients electronically.

The funding can help provide treatment for opioid abusers and train doctors and other health care professionals in the best way to treat addiction, said Dr. David Stern, dean of the University of Tennessee College of Medicine.

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UTHSC Dept. Chair Joins Council on Alcohol Abuse


The Daily News

Dr. Alex Dopico of the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, who has spent more than 20 years researching the effects of alcohol on the brain, has been appointed to serve a four-year term on the National Advisory Council on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism.

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Handguns Now on Memphis College Campuses


Memphis Flyer

Dozens of staffers with Memphis-area colleges and universities are now fully free to pack heat on campus without anyone ever knowing.

State lawmakers gave full-time employees at state-run schools permission to carry a concealed handgun on campus this year with a bill Tennessee Governor Bill Haslam wouldn’t sign but allowed to become law. However, those employees had to have a state license and register with their school’s security office before they could secretly carry their sidearm to, say, teach class, clean the grounds, or type a memo.

Registration began at Tennessee schools right around July 1st. So far, the University of Memphis (U of M) said 36 staffers have registered to carry handguns on campus. At the University of Tennessee Health Science Center (UTHSC), 22 have registered. Southwest Tennessee Community College (STCC) officials said 17 have registered to carry guns.

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UT Health Science Center is partnering with Emory University for a Holistic Health Fair this weekend as a part of Emory Cares International Service Day.

 

In The Media

UT, ORNL See Future of Eye Disease Diagnosis


As a retinal specialist, Dr. Edward Chaum pores over hundreds of images of patients’ eyes a year, looking for diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, which can lead to blindness if not caught and treated early.

But what he sees coming in the future scares him: a predicted fivefold increase in diabetic patients over the next three decades, an onslaught of potentially diseased eyes – and not enough specialists to see them all.

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Minority-owned business helps UTHSC campus flourish


The Daily News

A local minority-owned business has secured a contract with the University of Tennessee Health Science Center (UTHSC) as part of an effort to make the campus and the Medical District more welcoming.

Immaculate Landscaping, a certified Minority Business Enterprise and Disadvantaged Business Enterprise with offices in Olive Branch, won the nearly $200,000 landscaping contract to create seasonal displays on the UTHSC campus.

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Football Concussions are a Concern at all Levels of the Game


WREG

Concussions have many NFL players pointing to the other side of the sport, what it leaves you with years later.

There is more research on the lasting damage from football concussions.

“What’s thought to happen is the brain can go forward or backward,” said Dr. Jack Tsao, a Professor of Neurology at University of Tennessee Health Science Center.

He said there is more focus now on the impact of long-term head blows like those in the NFL. One study found abnormal proteins around brain tissue that may hint at what can happen.