Dr. Weber is Fellow of International Academy of Cardiovascular Science

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Dr. Karl Weber, the Neuton S. Stern Professor of Cardiovascular Diseases at the UT Health Science Center, joins just 228 of the finest heart health professionals from 37 countries. Induction is based on outstanding achievement in education and research.

Dr. Karl Weber, the Neuton S. Stern Professor of Cardiovascular Diseases at the UT Health Science Center, is an optimist. Despite all the financial troubles that have hurt state-supported institutions in recent years, Dr. Weber said he is glad he made the move to Memphis three years ago.

He said he has appreciated the administrative support he has received since his arrival, and has enjoyed the camaraderie of the very talented faculty in medicine, dentistry, pharmacy and biomedical engineering.

He also said he revels in the fact that he is training future academics and researchers.

Oh, and by the way, he also wants to improve cardiovascular health worldwide.

Now that Dr. Weber has been named a Fellow of the International Academy of Cardiovascular Sciences, he has a hand up on that goal.

He joins just 228 of the finest heart health professionals from 37 countries. Induction is based on outstanding achievement in education and research.

“Many people wonder why I feel responsible for world health,” said Dr. Weber. “They say I should be concerned with the ill right here in town, in the Mid-South. I say what we do nationally and internationally is also important. I want to leave the world a better place than I found it.”

It’s no secret, with a growing population of elderly people, disease patterns will likely change. Dr. Weber said disease affecting the heart will most likely become more prevalent in countries where infectious diseases once dominated and determined life expectancy.

“As people continue to live longer, will they live healthier?” said Dr. Weber. “We should not simply presume this the case, but ensure it is so. As Fellows, we must broaden our perspective.”

Dr. Weber hopes to have financial support for international studies on world health by the time the American Section of the International Society for Heart Research meets in Cancun in May 2003.

Pipe dream or realistic?

“There is talk about it already,” said Dr. Weber. “There are plans emerging.”

But while he wishes to make things happen on an international level, he said he will never lose site of his work at UTHSC.

Dr. Weber is the director of the UT division of cardiovascular diseases. The division has gained notoriety recently in its focus on genes and proteins expressed by blood cells. These genes and proteins could serve as biomarkers of the risk, onset and progression of heart failure.

Dr. Weber said UT is a great place to be right now.

“We are moving in a positive direction with the notion of growth,” he said. “Some institutions are simply monitoring their vital signs. If you are merely monitoring your financial vitality, then you don’t scheme, plan and dream.”