Cashion Inducted as Fellow into American Academy of Nursing

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Ann Cashion, PhD, associate professor and chair of the Acute and Chronic Care Department at the UTHSC College of Nursing, was inducted into the American Academy of Nursing as one of the 2006 new Fellows.

Ann Cashion, PhD, associate professor and chair of the Acute and Chronic Care Department at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center College of Nursing was inducted into the American Academy of Nursing as one of the 2006 new Fellows. She was nominated for this honor by two current Academy Fellows and was selected by a fifteen-member Fellow Selection Committee for her outstanding achievements in the nursing profession. Dr. Cashion was formally inducted as a Fellow with fifty-four other nurse leaders during the Academy’s Annual Awards Ceremony and Induction Banquet in Miami, FL.

The Academy is constituted to anticipate national and international trends in health care, and address resulting issues of health care knowledge and policy. Not only is the invitation to Fellowship recognition of one’s accomplishments within the nursing profession, but also it affords an opportunity to work with other leaders in health care in addressing the issues of the day. The Academy’s mission is to serve the public and nursing profession by advancing health policy and practice through the generation, synthesis and dissemination of nursing knowledge.

After receiving her BSN in nursing from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, Dr. Cashion completed her master’s degree at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, and her doctorate in nursing at UTHSC. She also completed post-doctorate work at Georgetown University and Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center.

Additionally, Dr. Cashion is actively involved in redesigning nursing curricula to incorporate rapidly expanding genetics content. Her most recent National Institute of Nursing Research study, “Genetic Markers of Acute Pancreas Allograft Rejection,” examines specific genetic biomarkers for the ability to identify transplant recipients who are in sub-clinical stages of acute rejection.