AED/CPR Trainings Set This Month for UTHSC Campus Community

|
CPR/AED classes, like this one from a previous year, are designed to teach faculty, staff, and students how to successfully react in an emergency.
Campus CPR/AED classes, like this one from a previous year, are designed to teach faculty, staff, and students how to successfully respond in an emergency.

Eleven years ago, Kelly Rogers, PharmD, BCCP, FCCP, FACC, professor of Clinical Pharmacy and Translational Science at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, organized a CPR/AED training class for the campus community.

The free class has been held every year since, with the exception of 2020, when the global pandemic intervened, said Dr. Rogers, who also is the Campus AED Program coordinator

This year, AED/CPR trainings are planned on Friday, October 29, in the Student-Alumni Center at 8:45 a.m. and 12:45 p.m. While this training does not meet the requirements for health care providers, the American Heart Association course will teach faculty, staff, and students how to successfully respond with CPR or an AED in an emergency situation.

Those wishing to participate must register at the event link to reserve a spot, as space is limited. Masks are required during the class.

This CPR certification is good for two years. Because there was no class in 2020, those who took the training in 2019 or 2018 should renew their certification, Dr. Rogers said.

“Approximately 90-95% of people who suffer a sudden cardiac arrest will die before they reach the hospital,’ Dr. Rogers said. “If a bystander uses an AED and performs high-quality CPR on that victim, the chance of survival can double.”

Dr. Rogers said that with the commitment of the campus administration, AEDs were purchased for all buildings and locations where faculty, staff, and students work every day to ensure that if an emergency happens, everything possible can be done to help save a life. “In order to have AEDs, you must have people who know how to use them and how to perform high-quality chest compressions, as that is what will make the difference between life and death,” she said.  “This is important for a health science center campus, because we are training health care professionals and we need to lead by example.”